Jack London State Historic Park in Glen Ellen, CA celebrates the great adventure writer and his visionary chosen home/farm. His house burned, tragically, shortly after its construction. Hike there now to view the ruins and celebrate the beauty of nature.
By Lee Foster (I am updating the 52 chapters in my book Northern California History Weekends for a new edition. This and other books of mine on California can be seen on my Amazon Author Page at http://amzn.to/1jl9Lnz). This chapter is: The...
All year, Chinatown San Francisco presents an intriguing and exotic walk for any visitor to the city. A January-February visitor will be especially fortunate. The celebration of the Chinese New Year includes cheerful urban cacophony of unparalleled dimension.
I am out exploring California as I update my book Northern California History Weekends for a new edition. This chapter is about the enduring mystery of where Sir Francis Drake landed in Point Reyes and how an impressive redwood grove was saved north of San Francisco and named to honor John Muir.
The spirit of Billy Ralston is one of the best introductions to San Mateo County, the strip of land immediately south of San Francisco.
Senator Leland Stanford and his wife, Jane, created Leland Stanford Junior University to honor the tragic death of their only child, a boy. As they said, "The children of California will be our children." Today, anyone can visit Stanford University, one of the lovelier campuses in the West, adjacent to Palo Alto.
Sarah Winchester, the heiress to the Winchester rifle fortune, built a 160-room mansion in San Jose, partly because she was obsessed with the process of building and partly because she had a disposable income of $1,000 a day.
The historic origin of modern San Jose, CA, can be seen in the Santa Clara Mission and in the downtown preservation of the Peralta Adobe and Fallon House.
There was a time in the 1960s, when Mario Savio spawned a Free Speech movement and protestors unhappy with the Vietnam War led an ongoing anti-war chant. At that time many Americans had a definite opinion on Berkeley, the stronghold of both movements.
The thrill of a 21-mile ride on an authentic steam train carrying you back to the fabulously wealthy silver mining history of Nevada should be high on your must-do exploration list regarding the American West.
The simple joy of a Cable Car ride in San Francisco is something every visitor should consider.
Coastal San Mateo, south of San Francisco on Highway 1, is a joy to drive. It presents lighthouses and historic shipwrecks as well as ethnic history (such as Portuguese farmers), small towns, and appealing beaches, some with tidepools.
Small railroads played an important role in the historic development of Northern California. Today one of those railroads, the Skunk Train, continues to flourish as an excursion train between Fort Bragg and Willits on the Mendocino Coast.
The California gray whale, art, and the ecological consciousness of the state can be enjoyed along the preserved Northern California Mendocino coast.
There was a time in the early history of California when Russia might have been destined to play a much larger role in the state's history. In its quest for furs, the Russians established a North American beachhead at Sitka, Alaska, at the dawn of the 19th century.
As I update this chapter on Oakland in my book Northern California History Weekends, I see how this great city preserves the legacy of its favorite literary native son and enlivens the downtown with new energy, such as a new Cuban restaurant.
As I update this Golden Gate chapter in my book Northern California History Weekends: 52 Adventures in History for a new release, I am reminded of the joy and beauty that so many San Francisco visitors experience because of their encounter with the Golden Gate Bridge.
As I go to Yosemite to see the 2016 waterfalls on parade, after the snowy winter, I update this Yosemite chapter of my book Northern California History Weekends.
I am rediscovering the California Gold Country as I travel Highway 49 and update my book chapter titled “Rambling California’s Historic Highway 49: Starting with Columbia, the Preserved Gold Rush Town.” This is a chapter in my book Northern California History Weekends, which will come out in a new edition in 2017.
I am rediscovering the California Gold Country as I ramble Highway 49 and update my book chapter titled “One Lucky Day at the Sawmill: How James Marshall Discovered Gold at Coloma.”
John Steinbeck's house in Salinas and the National Steinbeck Center two blocks away acquaint a traveler with the life and novels of this literary icon, who wrote the classics, The Grapes of Wrath and Cannery Row.
In spite of the Great Quake and Fire of 1906, which destroyed 28,000 buildings, impressive pockets of San Francisco's Victorian architecture survived. They can be enjoyed today, if you know where to find them. The 14,000 structures that remained were mainly west of Van Ness Avenue.