More from the Travel Blog

The oldest living things of Earth are the Bristlecone pine trees in the White Mountains of California, east from Bishop.
The east side of California’s Sierra mountain range, with treasures like Mono Lake, Devils Postpile, and the Bristlecone pines, is a delight to explore. Underlying the beauty, however, is the unending struggle over California water.
The Eastern Sierra of California along Highway 395 beckons with its Fall Color, Bristlecone Pines, Erik Schat's Bakery, Eastern California Museum with Paiute Indian baskets, Manzanar Japanese internment site, Lone Pine Film History Museum, Alabama Hills movie site, and Whitney Portal views of Mt. Whitney.
I was asked recently to talk about the revolution in modern publishing at the California Writers Club in Sacramento. As I looked out at the 40 writers/authors in the audience, I realized with new clarity that the main reality in our rapidly changing publishing world is “the gradual empowerment of writers/authors/photographers,” especially from about 2005 to the present.
Mono Lake in the Eastern Sierra of California is noted for its tufa spires, which are otherworldly limestone deposits. Mono Lake's ecosystem has been an environmental regulation case because the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power earlier tried to drain water from much of the lake, causing coyotes to eat the migrating birds resting and nesting on the tufa. Draining the lake also endangered the brine shrimp and brine fly populations due to excessive salinity.
California's Mammoth Lakes offers many outdoor adventure possibilities in summer, from hiking in the back country to fishing for rainbow trout. Mono Lake's scenery, Devil's Postpile's striking rock forms, mountain biking down Mammoth Mountain, horse-packing day trips into Pika Lake, and trophy trout fishing in Hot Creek are some of the diverse pleasures.